Alcohol and Age Limit

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How drinking started

Fermented grain, fruit juice and honey are used alcohol (ethanol or ethanol) for thousands of years. Fermented drinks existed at the beginning of Egyptian civilization, and there is evidence of early alcohol drink in China about 7,000 years before Christ in India, an alcoholic beverage called sura, was used between 3000 and 2000 BC,

The Babylonians worshiped the goddess of wine from 2700 BC. In Greece, one of the first alcoholic beverages that was popular was mead, fermented honey and water. Greek literature is full of warnings against excessive alcohol consumption. Several American civilizations developed alcoholic beverages in the pre-Columbian period 1 times. Various fermented drinks from the Andean region of South America, originated from corn, grapes or apples, called “chicha”.

In the 16th century, alcohol (called “spirits”) was widely used for medical purposes. In the early eighteenth century, the British Parliament passed a law that encouraged the use of grain for distillation of alcoholic beverages. Cheap spirits dropped into the market and reached the middle of the eighteenth century. In the UK, gin consumption reached 18 million gallons, and alcoholism spread. The nineteenth century brought about change in attitudes, and the calibration movement began to promote moderate use of alcohol – which eventually became an incentive for a total ban. In 1920, the United States passed a law prohibiting the production, sale, import and export of narcotic liqueurs. The counterfeit alcohol trade exploded, and in 1933 a ban on alcohol was cancelled.

Alcohol and Teens

Alcohol is a cure for choice among many teenagers, and is used by younger teenagers than tobacco or illicit drugs. Particularly worrying among teenagers is the high prevalence of excessive alcohol consumption. Underage drinkers consume, on average, 4 to 5 cups per occasion about 5 times a month. In contrast, people aged 26 and over consumed 2-3 glasses on occasions, about 9 times a month. The use of alcohol by juveniles is one of the leading causes of mortality from injury, the leading cause of death for younger than 21 years. Every year, about 5000 people under the age of 21 die due to alcohol-related causes. These deaths include about 1,600 murders and 300 suicides.

The use of alcohol by juveniles is one of the leading causes of mortality from injury, the leading cause of death for younger than 21 years.

Alcohol also plays an important role in risky sexual behavior and increases the risk of physical and sexual aggression. Among students under the age of 21, 50,000 are the victims of rape associated with alcohol, and 43,000 are injured by another student who has been drinking.

Hidden Content

Should the Drinking Age Limit Be Lowered?

Lowering the age limit will reduce the excitement of breaking drinking laws. Normalizing the responsible use of alcohol in moderate amounts will make alcohol less taboo for young adults entering the college and workplace. Enabling 18 to 20-year-olds to drink alcohol in a regulated environment would reduce alcohol consumption. Forbidding this age-group drinking in bars, restaurants, and other licensed places encourages them to drink without supervision, such as fraternities or homes, where they would be prone to excessive drinking of alcohol and other dangerous behaviors.

Countries that allow or ban drinking alcohol

In many countries with large Muslim populations, alcohol is banned in most areas. Most countries that prohibit alcohol do so mostly for religious reasons. Here is a list of countries where alcohol consumption is illegal:

  1. Afghanistan: Although alcoholic beverages are prohibited in Afghanistan, there are many places that can sell drinks to strangers.
  2. Bahrain: In Bahrain, alcohol is available only in hotels and private non-Muslim sales permits. Drinking alcohol in the public is always unlawful, and drinking can actually throw you away from the lids.
  3. Bangladesh: Although alcohol is completely illegal here, laws (and local habits) are now a bit smooth. Hotel bars – though very expensive – are legal, and according to some sources there are “sketchy ” bars outside the hotel. To bring a bottle home, you still need a foreign passport, although it is at the airport and duty free, and bribing will do wonders for the locals who get a bottle or two, as well.
  4. Brunei: This country rich in oil has extremely strict laws – and pretty heavy penalties, including the ban on drinking alcohol. Although unlawful for small people, it is well known that the Sultan of the Brunei family has organized extravagant parties that are not too dry.
  5. India: India probably has the most complex alcohol laws in all countries: the legality of alcohol and age limits depends on the state, there are many dry days in the states Wet conditions and age restrictions vary greatly across the country. In Gujarati, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland and the island of Lakshadweep alcohol is completely illegal.
  6. Yemen: Alcohol is totally banned in Yemen because it is considered to be contrary to the principles of Islam. Yemenis should not drink alcohol in the country and alcohol sales are prohibited in all parts of the country, with the exception of Aden and Sana’a where drinks are being sold in some restaurants, hotels and licensed nightclubs. Non-Muslim parties may have a limited amount of alcohol in the country and drink in their private area.
  7. Mauritania: In the Islamic Republic of Mauritania in the west of North Africa, Muslim residents of the country banned the possession, consumption, sale and production of alcohol. Non-Muslims, however, can drink alcohol at home or in places like hotels and restaurants that have a valid alcohol sales permit.

What is true and incorrect since the age limit?

What’s right about the age limit?

Allow 18 to 20 years of drinking alcohol in a regulated environment control to reduce unsafe consumer spending. Forbidding this age-group drinking in bars, restaurants, and other licensed places encourages them to drink without supervision, such as fraternities or homes, where they would be prone to excessive drinking of alcohol and other dangerous behaviors.

What’s wrong with the age limit?

Decreasing ages 21 to 18 will allow unaccompanied residents to drink alcohol in insecure bars and nightclubs. 76% of bars sold alcohol to buyers clearly drunk, and about half of drivers arrested for driving while being alcoholic (DWI) or killed in traffic accidents consumed alcohol at licensed establishments. Neighbors with a greater density of cafes, nightclubs and other alcoholic drinks shops have more frequent attacks and other violent crimes.

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